Is the Notion of Liberal Democracy inherently contradictory?

The notion of liberal democracy consists of two components- one, "democracy", referring to a political process, and the other, "liberal", referring to a political outcome. The argument that it is a contradictory notion lies in the fact that to presuppose or predefine politcal outcomes as liberal (consistent with liberal principles of individual autonomy, freedom from … Continue reading Is the Notion of Liberal Democracy inherently contradictory?

Dahl’s defence of Democracy against Anarchism and Guardianship

Dahl starts with differentiating democracy against anarchism. He defines anarchism as basing on four assumptions (Dahl 1989, 39ff): No one is obligated to support a bad state. All states are coercive. Coercion is intrinsically bad. A society without a state is a feasible alternative to a society with a state. Following from the assumptions he … Continue reading Dahl’s defence of Democracy against Anarchism and Guardianship

Consolidated and Non-Consolidated Democracies

Democratic consolidation is understood as the process in which a new democracy becomes more established and less likely to return to a non-democratic regime. Examples of consolidated democracies are the United States, Germany and the United Kingdom. These democracies have well-established political systems. The most important features of the systems are specified in the states’ … Continue reading Consolidated and Non-Consolidated Democracies

Analysis and Definition of Political Institutions

How should we define political institutions? According to the Stanford Encyclopedia, social institutions are commonly understood as sets of rules and norms that organise human activities within a society. Following that definition, political institutions could be defined as sets of rules and norms that organise political activity. Institutions do not necessarily have to be written … Continue reading Analysis and Definition of Political Institutions